Mallory McInnis

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I’m using Halloween as an excuse to make a mix of scary songs. Scary songs that happen to be from movies.

Cover art = G’MORK! The most horrifying creature ever (from The Neverending Story).

1. “The Shining (Main Title)” by Wendy Carlos & Rachel Elkind - my favorite scary movie / the movie that scares me the most.

2. “The Big Bad Clown” by Richard Bellis - the scariest clown ever.

3. “The Headless Horseman” by Bing Crosby - one of my very favorite Disney shorts.

4. “Late Night Double Feature Picture Show” from The Rocky Horror Picture Show - I remember renting this movie when I was in 6th grade or so and feeling like it wasn’t something my parents would necessarily approve of, so I watched it while they were at one of my sister’s basketball games. I was pretty unsettled by the opening credits. Imagine waking up in a dark room with the song playing and those lips projected on a huge blank wall. It would be frightening. 

5. “Total Eclipse of the Heart” by Bonnie Tyler - after seeing Urban Legend it took a long time before I could listen to this song in a car without feeling like I was going to get axed. 

6. “A Night on Bald/Bare Mountain” performed by Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra - the most horrifying part of Fantasia.

7. “Main Titles” from Beetlejuice by Danny Elfman.

8. “The End of the World” by Skeeter Davis - after watching Girl, Interrupted, whenever I hear this song I feel like I’m going to find someone swinging from a noose.

9. “Another Brick in the Wall” by Class of ‘99 from The Faculty - I watched this movie about 100 times at sleepovers in middle school. Zeke. Stokely. Delilah. Marybeth Louise Hutchinson. Stan. Casey. Jon Stewart with a pencil in his eye.

10. “Always on My Mind” by Elvis Presley - I’m very fond of Practical Magic, so I’m not very fond of this song. 

11. “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane from The Game - if you ever want to scare me, have this song blaring in my home before I get there (like what happens to Nicholas Van Orton in the movie).You wouldn’t even have to use the blacklight paint…. the song alone would be enough.

12. “Main Title Reprise” from Rosemary’s Baby by Krzysztof Komeda - hopefully Mia Farrow wasn’t quite this creepy when she sang her own children lullabies. 

13. “Creep” cover performed by Scala & Kolacny Brothers - I don’t think they actually used this song in the movie, but I loved the trailer for The Social Network so much (so much more than I loved the movie itself) & this song is the reason why.

14. “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree” by Glenn Miller - when I was in 7th or 8th grade I asked my mom to rent me a scary movie at the video store, and she came home with In DreamsThis song has freaked me out ever since (although in the movie they use the version by The Andrews Sisters).

15. “Alone Again / ‘Twas Brillig / Lose Something” from Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland - Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum scare me, but not as much as the Cheshire Cat.

16. “There Will Be Blood” by Jonny Greenwood from There Will Be Blood - the whole score is as creepy (and great) as Daniel Day Lewis.

17. “Within You” by David Bowie from Labyrinth - I loved David Bowie as a kid (I’d dress up as Jareth all the time)… but he terrified me as well.

18. “Pink Elephants on Parade” from Walt Disney’s Dumbo - one of the most unsettling scenes in a Disney movie

19. “Midnight, the Stars and You” by Ray Noble & His Orchestra from The Shining - the reason why a lot of old time-y 1930s-ish music scares me.

20. “The Moth” from Silence of the Lambs by Howard Shore - get out of there, Clarice.

21. “Cape Fear” performed by The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra from (obviously) Cape Fear - I’ve seen both versions, but Robert De Niro is the scarier Max Cady.

22. “Aurora’s Return / Maleficent’s Evil Spell” from Walt Disney’s Sleeping Beauty - the earliest instance in my life of doing the whole shouting-at-the-tv-to-warn-a-character thing.

23. “G’mork” by Klaus Doldinger from The NeverEnding Story - that fucking wolf used to scare me so much. Sometimes I’d stop watching the movie before it got to this part.

I love As Good as It Gets so much.
It came out in 1997 and I went to go see it with my mom and my dad. I was 11 and in middle school and I remember sitting in the theater and seeing a few girls I knew from school walking in. They didn’t see me. Half way through the movie, they got up and left. Next week at school I heard them talking about how boring it was. IDIOTS. I LOVED IT.
And will continue to love it forever more.
Frankly, I will not consider my life to be worthwhile until I own a Brussels Griffon like Verdell. 
Anyway - it’s now available to watch instantly on Netfilx. This means nothing to me (since it’s one of the first movies I ever owned on DVD), but…. maybe you aren’t lucky enough to own it.
I also urge you to look at the As Good as It Gets imdb page because Jill the Dog is actually listed as a cast member. & the trivia page includes so many gems. Can you imagine if John Travolta had actually ended up playing Melvin? THE HORROR.

I love As Good as It Gets so much.

It came out in 1997 and I went to go see it with my mom and my dad. I was 11 and in middle school and I remember sitting in the theater and seeing a few girls I knew from school walking in. They didn’t see me. Half way through the movie, they got up and left. Next week at school I heard them talking about how boring it was. IDIOTS. I LOVED IT.

And will continue to love it forever more.

Frankly, I will not consider my life to be worthwhile until I own a Brussels Griffon like Verdell. 

Anyway - it’s now available to watch instantly on Netfilx. This means nothing to me (since it’s one of the first movies I ever owned on DVD), but…. maybe you aren’t lucky enough to own it.

I also urge you to look at the As Good as It Gets imdb page because Jill the Dog is actually listed as a cast member. & the trivia page includes so many gems. Can you imagine if John Travolta had actually ended up playing Melvin? THE HORROR.

I now believe that the movie the Titanic bashers were talking about — the junky embarrassing one, the one with cringe-worthy dialogue, the one that only a teenager could love — is a figment of their imaginations. Yet the hostility directed toward Titanic, the venom that you will read by commenters on almost any article about the movie, including this one, can’t merely be dismissed. It has to be recognized for what it was, and still is: One of the founding manifestos of hater culture. Titanic came out just as the Internet was starting to rise up and merge into the ocean of our lives, and though, at that point, most of the hate directed at the movie was conversational and anecdotal, in spirit it was computer-viral. It was about fragments of resentment banding together and organizing themselves into a cult, a movement, an anti-fan club.

                - Owen Gleiberman on Titanic